Argument essay introduction - ErasmusparkGoesNl Argument essay introduction - ErasmusparkGoesNl

Argument essay introduction

Argument essay introduction

The «Analyze an Argument» task assesses your ability to understand, analyze and evaluate arguments according to specific instructions and to convey argument essay introduction evaluation clearly in your writing. Each topic consists of a brief passage in which the author makes a case for some course of action or interpretation of events by presenting claims backed by reasons and evidence. Your task is to discuss the logical soundness of the author’s case by critically examining the line of reasoning and the use of evidence.

This task requires you to read the argument and instructions carefully. You might want to read the argument more than once and make brief notes about points you want to develop more fully in your response. You are not being asked to discuss whether the statements in the argument are true or accurate. You are not being asked to agree or disagree with the position stated. Instead, you are being asked to evaluate the logical soundness of an argument of another writer and, in doing so, to demonstrate the critical thinking, perceptive reading and analytical writing skills that university faculty consider important for success in graduate school. It is important that you address the argument according to the specific instructions.

Write a response in which you discuss what specific evidence is needed to evaluate the argument and explain how the evidence would weaken or strengthen the argument. Be sure to explain how the argument depends on these assumptions, and what the implications are for the argument if the assumptions prove unwarranted. Write a response in which you discuss what questions would need to be answered in order to decide whether the recommendation and the argument on which it is based are reasonable. Be sure to explain how the answers to these questions would help to evaluate the recommendation. Write a response in which you discuss what questions would need to be answered in order to decide whether the advice and the argument on which it is based are reasonable.

Be sure to explain how the answers to these questions would help to evaluate the advice. Write a response in which you discuss what questions would need to be answered in order to decide whether the recommendation is likely to have the predicted result. Write a response in which you discuss what questions would need to be answered in order to decide whether the prediction and the argument on which it is based are reasonable. Be sure to explain how the answers to these questions would help to evaluate the prediction. Write a response in which you discuss what questions would need to be addressed in order to decide whether the conclusion and the argument on which it is based are reasonable. Be sure to explain how the answers to the questions would help to evaluate the conclusion.

Analyze an Argument» is a critical thinking task requiring a written response. Online Get never-before-offered official GRE practice tests, scores within minutes for all three measures and explanations for correct answers! ETS — Measuring the Power of Learning. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the subject as it is studied in logic and philosophy.

In logic and philosophy, an argument is a series of statements typically used to persuade someone of something or to present reasons for accepting a conclusion. In a typical deductive argument, the premises guarantee the truth of the conclusion, while in an inductive argument, they are thought to provide reasons supporting the conclusion’s probable truth. The standards and criteria used in evaluating arguments and their forms of reasoning are studied in logic. Informal arguments as studied in informal logic, are presented in ordinary language and are intended for everyday discourse. There are several kinds of arguments in logic, the best-known of which are «deductive» and «inductive. An argument has one or more premises but only one conclusion. These truth values bear on the terminology used with arguments.

A deductive argument asserts that the truth of the conclusion is a logical consequence of the premises. A deductive argument is said to be valid or invalid. If yes, the argument is valid. In determining validity, the structure of the argument is essential to the determination, not the actual truth values. If a deductive argument is valid and its premises are all true, then it is also referred to as sound.