Boston college paper - ErasmusparkGoesNl Boston college paper - ErasmusparkGoesNl

Boston college paper

Boston college paper

Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the private university founded in boston college paper. Not to be confused with Boston College.

The university has more than 3,900 faculty members and nearly 33,000 students, and is one of Boston’s largest employers. Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The Boston University Terriers compete in the NCAA Division I. BU athletic teams compete in the Patriot League, and Hockey East conferences, and their mascot is Rhett the Boston Terrier. Boston University traces its roots to the establishment of the Newbury Biblical Institute in Newbury, Vermont in 1839, and was chartered with the name «Boston University» by the Massachusetts Legislature in 1869. The University organized formal Centennial observances both in 1939 and 1969. 25, 1839 a group of Methodist ministers and laymen at the Old Bromfield Street Church in Boston elected to establish a Methodist theological school.

Set up in Newbury, Vermont, the school was named the «Newbury Biblical Institute». In 1847, the Congregational Society in Concord, New Hampshire, invited the Institute to relocate to Concord and offered a disused Congregational church building with a capacity of 1200 people. Other citizens of Concord covered the remodeling costs. Aspinwall Hill in Brookline, Massachusetts, as a possible relocation site.

The institute moved in 1867 to 23 Pinkney Street in Boston, and received a Massachusetts Charter as the «Boston Theological Institute». In 1869, three trustees of the Boston Theological Institute obtained from the Massachusetts Legislature a charter for a university by name of «Boston University». These trustees were successful Boston businessmen and Methodist laymen, with a history of involvement in educational enterprises and became the founders of Boston University. The Boston Theological Institute was absorbed into Boston University in 1871 as the BU School of Theology.

In January 1872 Isaac Rich died, leaving the vast bulk of his estate to a trust that would go to Boston University after ten years of growth while the University was organized. Kilgore describes this as the largest single donation to an American college or university to that time. As a result, the University was unable to build its contemplated campus on Aspinwall Hill, and the land was sold piecemeal as development sites. Street names in the area, including Claflin Road, Claflin Path, and University Road, are the only remaining evidence of University ownership in this area. After receiving a year’s salary advance to allow him to pursue his research in 1875, Alexander Graham Bell, then a professor at the university, invented the telephone in a Boston University laboratory.