Quick essay - ErasmusparkGoesNl Quick essay - ErasmusparkGoesNl

Quick essay

Quick essay

Quick essay should never have a quotation standing alone as a complete sentence, or, worse, as an incomplete sentence, in your writing. The quotation will seem disconnected from your own thoughts and from the flow of your sentences.

Ways to integrate quotations properly into your own sentences, with correct use of punctuation, are explained below. There are at least four ways to integrate quotations. Introduce the quotation with a complete sentence and a colon. Example: In «Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,» Thoreau states directly his purpose for going into the woods: «I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.

Example: Thoreau’s philosophy might be summed up best by his repeated request for people to ignore the insignificant details of life: «Our life is frittered away by detail. An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest. Example: Thoreau ends his essay with a metaphor: «Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in. This is an easy rule to remember: if you use a complete sentence to introduce a quotation, you need a colon after the sentence. Using a comma in this situation will most likely create a comma splice, one of the serious sentence-boundary errors. Use an introductory or explanatory phrase, but not a complete sentence, separated from the quotation with a comma. Example: In «Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,» Thoreau states directly his purpose for going into the woods when he says, «I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.

Example: Thoreau asks, «Why should we live with such hurry and waste of life? You should also use a comma when you introduce a quotation with a phrase such as «According to Thoreau. Make the quotation a part of your own sentence without any punctuation between your own words and the words you are quoting. Example: In «Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,» Thoreau states directly his purpose for going into the woods when he says that «I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. Example: Thoreau argues that «shams and delusions are esteemed for soundest truths, while reality is fabulous. Example: According to Thoreau, people are too often «thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito’s wing that falls on the rails. Notice that the word «that» is used in three of the examples above, and when it is used as it is in the examples, «that» replaces the comma which would be necessary without «that» in the sentence.

You usually have a choice, then, when you begin a sentence with a phrase such as «Thoreau says. Use short quotations—only a few words—as part of your own sentence. Example: In «Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,» Thoreau states that his retreat to the woods around Walden Pond was motivated by his desire «to live deliberately» and to face only «the essential facts of life. Example: Thoreau argues that people blindly accept «shams and delusions» as the «soundest truths,» while regarding reality as «fabulous. Example: Although Thoreau «drink at» the stream of Time, he can «detect how shallow it is. When you integrate quotations in this way, you do not use any special punctuation. Instead, you should punctuate the sentence just as you would if all of the words were your own.